Old documentation

NOTE: This page is a direct copy of the old documentation. It will be reworked.

In your class's constructor you always receive as a last argument a container which you can use to get other dependencies.

class BeanFactory {
create() {}
}
class SugarFactory {
create() {}
}
class WaterFactory {
create() {}
}
class CoffeeMaker {
constructor(container) {
this.beanFactory = container.get(BeanFactory);
this.sugarFactory = container.get(SugarFactory);
this.waterFactory = container.get(WaterFactory);
}
make() {
this.beanFactory.create();
this.sugarFactory.create();
this.waterFactory.create();
}
}
var Container = require('typedi').Container;
var coffeeMaker = Container.get(CoffeeMaker);
coffeeMaker.make();

With TypeDI you can use a named services. Example:

var Container = require('typedi').Container;
class BeanFactory implements Factory {
create() {}
}
class SugarFactory implements Factory {
create() {}
}
class WaterFactory implements Factory {
create() {}
}
class CoffeeMaker {
beanFactory: Factory;
sugarFactory: Factory;
waterFactory: Factory;
constructor(container) {
this.beanFactory = container.get('bean.factory');
this.sugarFactory = container.get('sugar.factory');
this.waterFactory = container.get('water.factory');
}
make() {
this.beanFactory.create();
this.sugarFactory.create();
this.waterFactory.create();
}
}
Container.set('bean.factory', new BeanFactory(Container));
Container.set('sugar.factory', new SugarFactory(Container));
Container.set('water.factory', new WaterFactory(Container));
Container.set('coffee.maker', new CoffeeMaker(Container));
var coffeeMaker = Container.get('coffee.maker');
coffeeMaker.make();

This feature especially useful if you want to store (and inject later on) some settings or configuration options. For example:

var Container = require('typedi').Container;
// somewhere in your global app parameters
Container.set('authorization-token', 'RVT9rVjSVN');
class UserRepository {
constructor(container) {
this.authorizationToken = container.get('authorization-token');
}
}

When you write tests you can easily provide your own "fake" dependencies to classes you are testing using set method:

Container.set(CoffeeMaker, new FakeCoffeeMaker());
// or for named services
Container.set([
{ id: 'bean.factory', value: new FakeBeanFactory() },
{ id: 'sugar.factory', value: new FakeSugarFactory() },
{ id: 'water.factory', value: new FakeWaterFactory() },
]);

TypeDI also supports a function dependency injection. Here is how it looks like:

var Service = require('typedi').Service;
var Container = require('typedi').Container;
var PostRepository = Service(() => ({
getName() {
return 'hello from post repository';
},
}));
var PostManager = Service(() => ({
getId() {
return 'some post id';
},
}));
class PostQueryBuilder {
build() {
return 'SUPER * QUERY';
}
}
var PostController = Service([PostManager, PostRepository, PostQueryBuilder], (manager, repository, queryBuilder) => {
return {
id: manager.getId(),
name: repository.getName(),
query: queryBuilder.build(),
};
});
var postController = Container.get(PostController);
console.log(postController);